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Carolyn in MN

Oh, I'd love a stove. Wood, LP Gas ... it would be so lovely to have next to my knitting chair at this time of year. And so in the way come summer.

What happens when a stove is overfired? The part between the adding the wood and turning the air flow down is beyond my current understanding of stoves. And does the timer constantly beep, or ???

Jean in Wisconsin

>What happens when a stove is overfired?

It means the stove gets too hot. If there is any soot in the stove pipe, it could catch fire, causing a chimney fire. The instruction manual warns not to regularly allow the stove to run 800+ degrees or the joints in the stove could weaken. Also, there is more of a chance of a house fire if the stove gets really hot and is not controlled.

>The part between the adding the wood and turning the air flow down is beyond my current understanding of stoves. And does the timer constantly beep, or ???

It takes a while for the newly added wood to catch fire and warm up enough for the stove to be 450 degrees. So we open the air flow as much as we can, which gives the fire more oxygen and speeds up how long it will take (also, if it there is too little air, the fire might go out). The air flow must be turned down at some point or else the stove will get too hot (expecially if we've filled the fire box with a lot of wood). I can't stand around waiting for the stove to warm up (sometimes over an hour--depends on the wood and the number of coals remaining). So we have a little kitchen timer that we set for 20 minutes. When it beeps, we check to see what the stove temp is. If it isn't up to 450, we reset the timer. No one is suppose to turn the timer off unless he has turned the air flow down.

Does that answer your Q?

:-) Jean

Jean in Wisconsin

I've had so many people stop by my blog when Googling for info on wood stoves and over firing that I wrote up another blog post about it. It is here:
http://shadesofwhite.typepad.com/shades_of_white/2008/12/overfiring-the-wood-stove.html

I've kept our stove running 24/7 for many years through the winter months. I hope the info can help someone :).

stove pipe

Thanks for the steps. I recently got a wood stove myself and it is work to keep the fire going, but worth it.

woodworking books on cutting boards

The part between the adding the wood and turning the air flow down is beyond my current understanding of stoves.

Robert Beaty

what causes the outside of the stove to turn white

Brian

My guess is a lot of people buy a wood stove figuring it's cheap and easy to run - just throw in some wood and let 'er rip....cozy and warm 24/7. There was a rush on stoves in this area (New Hampshire) a couple of years ago and now the dealers are dying from lack of customers. I'll bet a lot of folks bought a stove only to discover that it takes a lot of work to heat with wood - hauling the wood, stacking the wood, bringing it into the house, filling the stove, cleaning out the ashes .... and anyone who put in a stove and expected a nice even heat like they had from an oil or gas furnace certainly got a rude awakening. They most likely woke up in the morning to a cold house and came home from work to an even colder house. But, for all the work and annoyances, I love heating with wood. I'm retired, so I can tend the stove throughout the day as needed. I cut my own wood, split, let it season for 18 to 24 months and then enjoy the heat it puts out.

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